Folklores_of_Japan

Since I was raised by my maternal grandfather, I have a tendency to think that his family is my family.  I knew next to zero about my paternal family.  

I managed to track down my paternal family and could only get as far back as my great-great-grandfather Sadasaku.  The current generation seems to have “disappeared” into a new family tree in 1958.  I think 1958 was when grandfather Manki adopted his younger brotherʻs youngest son Mitsuo.

My maternal grandfatherʻs family can be “traced” back non-contiguously through about 5 name changes to Minamoto no Tōru, son of the Emperor Saga by the Court Lady Ōhara no Matako (大原全子), daughter of Ōhara no Mamuro (大原真室).  Various documents have Watanabe no Tsuna as Tōruʻs great-grandson and Watanabe no Hisashi as Watanabe no Tsunaʻs grandson.  Watanabe no Hisashi became known as Matsūra Hisashi.

I became fascinated with Japanese folklores because of the tales of Raiko and the Shiten’ō.  They were demon hunters.  Both the Nihongi and the Kojiki, oldest history documents of Japan contain many folklores from the earliest times.

The oni folklores start with “there was a time when the oni and the humans lived together…”

©November  2019 by hisiamone